Jarvis Pizzeria: Fourth step in Implementing the Order Processing, Decision Model

In blog The various Decisions of a Decision Model we gave an overview of the various type of decisions that are available for a Decision Model. In this blog we show by means of an example that Decision Models can also be used for making complex decisions. We are going to make a decision model that determines the order of preparation of the pizzas in an order.

The order of preparation is determined by the baking time, the total preparation time of each pizza and the number of available ovens (1 pizza per oven). Let’s assume that we have an order for the following 9 pizzas:

  1. Small Margherita
  2. Large Margherita
  3. Small Pepperoni
  4. Medium Pepperoni
  5. Medium Pepperoni
  6. Large Pepperoni
  7. Small Quarttro Stagioni
  8. Medium Quarttro Stagioni
  9. Large Quarttro Stagioni

Expected outcome

The pizzas with the longest baking time are prepared first. When pizzas have the same baking time, the total preparation time is also taken into account to determine the order. As a result, to determine the sort order we first need to determine the baking time and total preparation time for each pizza.

Because not all pizzas can be prepared at the same time, pizzas that are not in the oven will have a waiting time. Once we have established the order, we can also determine the waiting time per pizza. We explain this with the help of the figure below.

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Jarvis Pizzeria: The various Decisions of a Decision Model

In one of our next posts we will implement the Decision Model in the Order Process. Before we do that we first explain the various type of decisions that are available for a Decision Model.

The Decision Model editor in PCS (Process Cloud Service) or the later OIC (Oracle Integration Cloud) supports the DMN (Decision Modeling Notation) standard version 1.1, and uses FEEL (Friendly Enough Expression Language) to make decision modeling easier and more intuitive.

In DMN all decision logic is represented as ‘boxed expressions’. A ‘boxed expression’ is a graphical notation for decision logic. Within OIC we recognize the following boxed expressions: Continue reading

Jarvis Pizzeria: Activating activities and attaining milestones

In our previous blogs we have given a brief overview of the look-and-feel of the dynamic process possibilities within PCS. In this blog we take a dive into the activation of activities, how milestones can be attained and how rules are configured to make sure that the correct actions are triggered when conditions are met.

Let’s take a look at our dynamic Jarvis overview first. In the picture below we came up with three stages: ordering, preparation and delivery.

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Jarvis Pizzeria: The logic underneath the Dynamic Process

In our previous blog we have made the first set up of our dynamic process. We created several stages and had the first processes, human tasks and milestones in there. Now that we have the first draft of the dynamic process, it is time to actually call some processes and human tasks from our dynamic process.

In this blog we will explain how that is done. We already had imported the Preparation Process Application. But the delivery and payment are not part of this application. They are part of the overall Jarvis Pizzeria application. So before this blog, we also imported the Jarvis 1.0 application and the DeliveryDM to the new integration cloud.

When we click the edit pencil of the ‘Prepare Pizza’ step, on the right hand side, we get to see the properties of this step. Under the Process section, we select the ‘PizzaPreparationProcess’ and the ‘start’ as start event.

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Jarvis Pizzeria: Setting up the Dynamic Process

In this blog we will implement a first version of the preparation of an order using a dynamic process. We continue where blog one stopped. The imported order process is extended with an example dynamic process.


We open the DynamicOrderProcess, which should still contains the example. We will build this so that it contains the Pizza ordering process. However, when opening the Process, we can see that the example is no longer there. Apparently, the example is not saved, maybe because we did not make any changes to it? Let’s create the example again, and then change it immediately. Continue reading

Jarvis Pizzeria: Getting Started with Dynamic Processes (ACM)

Getting started with the new integration cloud, the cloud that brings ICS, VBCS and PCS together. But it also includes the introduction of dynamic processes, Oracle’s new approach for adaptive case management. This introductory blog consists mainly of an overview of the different parts of dynamic processes. In addition, some differences between PCS and the Integration Cloud are discussed.

First step: import the Jarvis Pizza Preparation application. The location of this menu option is changed but the functionality is not. So we do this in two quick steps.

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Jarvis Pizzeria in Case Management Style

As our business grows and our digitalization kicks in, it is time to reevaluate our process setup. We are happy with our processes in Process Cloud, they are easy to set up and we can manage our process from Ordering a Pizza al the way through to delivery.

However as with any BPMN, this a very structured process. Sometimes we require a bit more flexibility.

We had a good chat with our friends from Oracle and we were very pleased to hear that our wish to become more flexible aligned with their plans for PCS. We were thinking towards a Case Management solution for our pizzas and got a very satisfying answer.

In October 2017, Oracle released the Oracle Integration Cloud (OIC), not to be confused with the Integration Cloud Service (ICS). The Integration Cloud brings together several Low Code products. VBCS, Visual Builder Cloud Service, for developing user interfaces, ICS, Integration Cloud Service, for creating your integrations in the Oracle Cloud. Stream Analytics, for smart analytics on your integrations & processes. And last, but certainly not least PCS, Process Cloud Service, that in their new release includes Dynamic Processes. These Dynamic Processes have a lot of Case Management features and have a notation that feels a lot and reminds us of CMMN.

For our Pizzeria business, this means a little redesign of our Structured Process into a CMMN like notation, that is more dynamic. This is helpful since it will make it easier for us to implement features such as ‘Requesting the Order Status’, ‘Changing the Order, ‘Support Payment later in the Order process’ and more.

In the blog posts to come, we will transform our structured pizzeria in a more dynamic design. Along the way we will highlight the core features of the Dynamic Process structure within PCS and help you get acquainted with them.