Jarvis Pizzeria: Fourth step in Implementing the Order Processing, Decision Model

In blog The various Decisions of a Decision Model we gave an overview of the various type of decisions that are available for a Decision Model. In this blog we show by means of an example that Decision Models can also be used for making complex decisions. We are going to make a decision model that determines the order of preparation of the pizzas in an order.

The order of preparation is determined by the baking time, the total preparation time of each pizza and the number of available ovens (1 pizza per oven). Let’s assume that we have an order for the following 9 pizzas:

  1. Small Margherita
  2. Large Margherita
  3. Small Pepperoni
  4. Medium Pepperoni
  5. Medium Pepperoni
  6. Large Pepperoni
  7. Small Quarttro Stagioni
  8. Medium Quarttro Stagioni
  9. Large Quarttro Stagioni

Expected outcome

The pizzas with the longest baking time are prepared first. When pizzas have the same baking time, the total preparation time is also taken into account to determine the order. As a result, to determine the sort order we first need to determine the baking time and total preparation time for each pizza.

Because not all pizzas can be prepared at the same time, pizzas that are not in the oven will have a waiting time. Once we have established the order, we can also determine the waiting time per pizza. We explain this with the help of the figure below.

Continue reading

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Jarvis Pizzeria: The various Decisions of a Decision Model

In one of our next posts we will implement the Decision Model in the Order Process. Before we do that we first explain the various type of decisions that are available for a Decision Model.

The Decision Model editor in PCS (Process Cloud Service) or the later OIC (Oracle Integration Cloud) supports the DMN (Decision Modeling Notation) standard version 1.1, and uses FEEL (Friendly Enough Expression Language) to make decision modeling easier and more intuitive.

In DMN all decision logic is represented as ‘boxed expressions’. A ‘boxed expression’ is a graphical notation for decision logic. Within OIC we recognize the following boxed expressions: Continue reading

Jarvis Pizzeria: Using a Decision Model in the Delivery Process

To make the delivery of the pizzas to our customer, we need to decide how to deliver the pizzas. In our process we’ve already got the order data, so we know what the order is and where it needs to be delivered, but what is the best way to deliver the pizzas?

We will create a decision model in PCS to help us with this decision. In the delivery process we will call the decision model like a service and use the answer to make the correct decision.

The input for the decision model will be the amount of pizzas and the distance to the customer. Based on these data we will decide to either use a bike, moped or car to do the delivery. A very common decision to make in the Netherlands, since we love our bikes and often deliver pizzas by bike rather than by car.

We start with going to the PCS home. All the way out of the jarvis application and on this home menu we click the create button. Here we see that besides new applications, we can also create a new decision model. This means the decision is not coupled directly to the application with our processes, but it is a stand alone decision model. Continue reading